Traditional Tiramisu Recipe (2024)

Published: Modified: / by Debbie Jones / This site uses cookies. This post may contain affiliate links. Privacy policy in footer. All opinions are my own. This site generates income via ads.

Jump to Recipe Jump to Video

Tiramisu is a light and airy, no bake, Italian dessert made with layers of creamy mascarpone and coffee dipped ladyfingers. This traditional tiramisu recipe is made in the authentic Italian way with whipped, raw eggs and mascarpone cheese.

Traditional Tiramisu Recipe (1)

Jump to:
  • 👩🏻‍🍳 Why make this recipe
  • 🥘 Ingredients
  • 🔪 Step by step instructions
  • 💭 Expert tips
  • ❓ Frequently asked questions
  • 🍨 Other dessert recipes
  • 📖 Recipe

👩🏻‍🍳 Why make this recipe

This tiramisu recipe is made in the traditional way using raw eggs, mascarpone cheese and ladyfingers dipped in strong coffee. There is no cream, which helps to keep this recipe light and airy. I like to try and keep things as authentic as possible and this Tiramisu comes straight from Italy. The recipe is adapted from a chef who works at Tenuta Torciano; a little winery in Tuscany. We visited Torciano whilst on our Italian honeymoon in 2017.

Making tiramisu this way may not be to everyones taste. As this is a no bake dessert the eggs are actually raw when served. However, this is what makes this dessert so incredible and the best tiramisu always uses raw eggs and no cream. Below I will show you how to prepare the eggs and tiramisu dessert properly so that you feel confident about serving up this traditional tiramisu recipe.

Please note that young children, pregnant women and those who are clinically vulnerable should avoid foods containing raw eggs, including tiramisu. In general I recommend using fresh eggs that have a lion stamp (UK). If you are not UK based then you should try to use fresh, pasteurised eggs.

🥘 Ingredients

To make this traditional tiramisu recipe you will need:

Traditional Tiramisu Recipe (2)

Ingredient notes

Ladyfingers: Use hard, crisp sponge fingers (not soft). The traditional tiramisu biscuits that are used in a traditional tiramisu are called Savoiardi. I used a deep dish (23x18x7cm) for this recipe and so needed 48 ladyfingers across 3 layers. You may need more or less depending on the size and depth of your dish.

Strong coffee: Freshly brew the coffee and if you can, use an espresso machine or ground coffee in a cafetiere. If you don't have access to these you can substitute for instant coffee.

Coffee liqueur: Optional - leave out if you prefer. I like to use Tia Maria, but any coffee liqueur will do.

Mascarpone cheese: Choose a good quality, full fat mascarpone cheese.

Eggs: As mentioned above, the eggs in this recipe will remain raw so make sure to use fresh eggs with the lion stamp (UK). Or if not in the UK use fresh, pasteurised eggs.

Caster sugar: The caster sugar (or bakers sugar) is essential in this recipe. It is added to the egg yolks and when whisked together the yolks become thick and creamy. This is known and a sabayon.

Cocoa powder: For dusting on the top of the finished dessert. Leave this off if you prefer and simply scatter with grated chocolate.

Cadburys flake: I love to top my tiramisu with both cocoa powder and crumbled bits of cadburys flake chocolate. If you can't get any flake, just substitute with normal milk chocolate and grate over the top.

🔪 Step by step instructions

  1. Start by separating the eggs, placing yolks in one bowl and whites in another. Make sure no yolk is mixed in with the whites.
  2. Next set up a stand mixer with whisk attachment or use an electric hand whisk. Place the egg yolks and caster sugar into the mixer and whisk together on high for 5 minutes until the yolks are pale and creamy.
  3. Change the attachment on the mixer to the paddle (or use a spatula). Add the mascarpone to the creamed yolks and mix together until well combined and thick and creamy.
  4. Transfer the mascarpone to separate large mixing bowl and clean out the stand mixer bowl. Reattach the whisk attachment (or use a clean mixing bowl and electric whisk). Add the egg whites to the mixer and whisk until stiff white peaks form.Traditional Tiramisu Recipe (3)
  5. Next add the whisked egg whites to the mascarpone mixture one third at a time. Use a spatular to gently fold the whites into the mixture in between each addition.
  6. Now its time to build the tiramisu. Have the creamy mascarpone mixture ready to use along with a large rectangular dish for the tiramisu. In a smaller bowl mix together the coffee and coffee liqueur. Briefly dip each lady finger into the coffee mix then place in the bottom of the rectangular dish. Repeat until the base is covered with a lager of ladyfingers.
  7. Next spoon about a third of the mascarpone mixture over the sponge fingers and smooth out to cover all the sponge using the back of a spoon. Add a second and then third layer of coffee dipped sponge fingers and mascarpone mixture. TIP: The layers in order from the bottom should be: ladyfingers, mascarpone, ladyfingers, mascarpone, lady fingers, mascarpone. If you prefer you can use a shallower dish and just do two layers.
  8. Finish the tiramisu by dusting over cocoa powder and scattering over crumbled or grated chocolate.Traditional Tiramisu Recipe (4)
  9. Finally, wrap the tiramisu dish in cling film and place into the fridge to chill overnight. Tiramisu is best eaten the next day when the whole thing has chilled completely, the mascarpone cream has set and the sponge has softened.

💭 Expert tips

  • This is a no bake dessert with raw eggs so make sure you use fresh, lion stamped (or pasteurised) eggs.
  • Make absolutely sure no yolk goes into the egg whites, as this will stop the whites from whipping up into stiff peaks.
  • Fold the mascarpone into the yolks using the paddle attachment on the stand mixer or using a spatula. Whisking may cause the mascarpone to curdle.
  • Use hard, crisp sponge fingers (not soft sponge).
  • Don't soak the ladyfingers for too long in the coffee. They literally just need a quick dunk in and out. If the sponge is too soggy the excess liquid will leak into the rest of the dessert.
  • Once made, chill over night and eat the next day. Tiramisu is always best eaten on the second day when it has set and the sponge has softened.

❓ Frequently asked questions

Does tiramisu have raw eggs?

Traditional Italian tiramisu uses raw eggs as does this recipe. For safety it is advised that young children, pregnant women and those who are clinically vulnerable should avoid foods containing raw eggs, including tiramisu. In general, I recommend using fresh eggs that have a lion stamp (UK). If you are not UK based then you should try to use fresh, pasteurised eggs.

Can you substitute raw eggs in tiramisu?

If you would prefer to not use raw eggs you can replace the egg whites with whipping cream (500 ml / 2 cups) and lightly cook the yolk and sugar. To cook the yolks, place the yolks and sugar in a glass mixing bowl and balance this on the top of a pan with a small amount of simmering water in the bottom (double boiler). Whisk the yolks and sugar over the pan allowing the steam to gently cook the yolk. Do not let the water touch the bottom of the bowl.

Why is my tiramisu watery?

Watery tiramisu occurs when the sponge ladyfingers have been soaked in the coffee for too long. The excess coffee drains into the rest of the dessert during chilling and makes the whole thing watery. Remember to dunk the sponge fingers briefly in the coffee; in and out.

How to store?

Once made wrap the tiramisu dish tightly in cling film and store in the fridge for up to 3 days. Tiramisu is always best eaten on the second day after it has chilled overnight.

Can you freeze tiramisu?

Dairy does not freeze or defrost well so I don't recommend that you freeze this dessert.

Traditional Tiramisu Recipe (5)

🍨 Other dessert recipes

  • Apple crumble
  • Baileys Irish Cream with Coffee
  • Banana Bread
  • Bakewell Tart
  • Cinnamon Swirls
  • Lemon Drizzle Cake

If you've tried this recipe, let me know what you think by leaving a star rating in the recipe card or comment section below.I always appreciate your feedback! You can also follow me on Pinterest, Facebook or Instagram or Sign up to my email list!

📖 Recipe

Traditional Tiramisu Recipe (6)

Traditional Tiramisu Recipe

By: Debbie Jones

Tiramisu is a light and airy, no bake, Italian dessert made with layers of creamy mascarpone and coffee dipped ladyfingers. This traditional tiramisu recipe is made in the authentic Italian way with whipped, raw eggs and mascarpone cheese.

Print Recipe Pin Recipe

Prep Time 45 minutes mins

Cook Time 0 minutes mins

Chill in the fridge 8 hours hrs

Total Time 8 hours hrs 45 minutes mins

Course afternoon tea, Dessert, party food, pudding, sweet, treat

Cuisine Italian

Servings 8 People

Calories 627 kcal

Equipment

  • Small bowls to separate eggs

  • Stand mixer or electric handheld whisk

  • Large mixing bowl

  • 23x18cm (9x7inch) rectangular serving dish (7cm/3inch depth)

  • Small bowl for coffee mixture

  • Sieve or duster for the cocoa powder

  • Cling film (plastic wrap)

Ingredients

  • 4 large fresh eggs with lion stamp or pasteurised
  • 150 g caster sugar
  • 500 g mascarpone cheese
  • 300 ml strong coffee
  • 100 ml Tia Maria or preferred coffee liqueur
  • 2 packs Ladyfingers (400g) (to keep it traditional use Savoiardi)
  • 1 teaspoon Cocoa powder
  • 25 g Cadbury flake or milk chocolate broke up or grated

Instructions

  • Start by separating the eggs, placing yolks in one bowl and whites in another. Make sure no yolk is mixed in with the whites.

  • Next set up a stand mixer with whisk attachment or use an electric hand whisk. Place the egg yolks and caster sugar into the mixer and whisk together on high for 5 minutes until the yolks are pale and creamy.

  • Change the attachment on the mixer to the paddle (or use a spatula). Add the mascarpone to the creamed yolks and mix together until well combined and thick and creamy.

  • Transfer the mascarpone to separate large mixing bowl and clean out the stand mixer bowl. Reattach the whisk attachment (or use a clean mixing bowl and electric whisk). Add the egg whites to the mixer and whisk until stiff white peaks form.

  • Next add the whisked egg whites to the mascarpone mixture one third at a time. Use a spatular to gently fold the whites into the mixture in between each addition.

  • Now its time to build the tiramisu. Have the creamy mascarpone mixture ready to use along with a large rectangular dish for the tiramisu. In a smaller bowl mix together the coffee and coffee liqueur. Briefly dip each lady finger into the coffee mix then place in the bottom of the rectangular dish. Repeat until the base is covered with a layer of ladyfingers.

  • Next spoon about a third of the mascarpone mixture over the sponge fingers and smooth out to cover all the sponge using the back of a spoon. Add a second and then third layer of coffee dipped sponge fingers and mascarpone mixture. TIP: The layers in order from the bottom should be: ladyfingers, mascarpone, ladyfingers, mascarpone, lady fingers, mascarpone. If you prefer you can use a shallower dish and just do two layers.

  • Finish the tiramisu by dusting over cocoa powder and scattering over crumbled or grated chocolate.

  • Finally, wrap the tiramisu dish in cling film and place into the fridge to chill overnight. Tiramisu is best eaten the next day when the whole thing has chilled completely, the mascarpone cream has set and the sponge has softened.

Video

Nutrition

Serving: 1eighth | Calories: 627kcal | Carbohydrates: 58g | Protein: 13g | Fat: 36g | Saturated Fat: 21g | Trans Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 255mg | Sodium: 142mg | Potassium: 117mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 26g | Vitamin A: 1272IU | Calcium: 125mg | Iron: 2mg

Notes

Does tiramisu have raw eggs? Traditional Italian tiramisu uses raw eggs as does this recipe. For safety it is advised that young children, pregnant women and those who are clinically vulnerable should avoid foods containing raw eggs, including tiramisu. In general, I recommend using fresh eggs that have a lion stamp (UK). If you are not UK based then you should try to use fresh, pasteurised eggs.

Can you substitute raw eggs in tiramisu? If you would prefer to not use raw eggs you can replace the egg whites with whipping cream (500 ml / 2 cups) and lightly cook the yolk and sugar. To cook the yolks, place the yolks and sugar in a glass mixing bowl and balance this on the top of a pan with a small amount of simmering water in the bottom (double boiler). Whisk the yolks and sugar over the pan allowing the steam to gently cook the yolk. Do not let the water touch the bottom of the bowl.

Why is my tiramisu watery? Watery tiramisu occurs when the sponge ladyfingers have been soaked in the coffee for too long. The excess coffee drains into the rest of the dessert during chilling and makes the whole thing watery. Remember to dunk the sponge fingers briefly in the coffee; in and out.

How to store? Once made wrap the tiramisu dish tightly in cling film and store in the fridge for up to 3 days. Tiramisu is always best eaten on the second day after it has chilled overnight.

Can you freeze tiramisu? Dairy does not freeze or defrost well so I don't recommend that you freeze this dessert.

Expert tips:

  • Make absolutely sure no yolk goes into the egg whites, as this will stop the whites from whipping up into stiff peaks.
  • Fold the mascarpone into the yolks using the paddle attachment on the stand mixer or using a spatula. Whisking may cause the mascarpone to curdle.
  • Use hard, crisp sponge fingers (not soft sponge).
  • Don't soak the ladyfingers for too long in the coffee. They literally just need a quick dunk in and out. If the sponge is too soggy the excess liquid will leak into the rest of the dessert.
  • Once made, chill over night and eat the next day. Tiramisu is always best eaten on the second day when it has set and the sponge has softened.

This post was first published in September 2017. Updated in March 2021 with an improved recipe, new images, step-by-step photos and recipe tips.

If you would like to access the original recipe you can do so here: Original Tiramisu recipe 2017

More Italian Recipes

  • Porcini Mushroom Risotto
  • Smoked Haddock Risotto
  • How To Make Pasta
  • Italian Pasta Salad
  • Email

Reader Interactions

Comments

    Leave a Reply

    This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

  1. Amanda Reed

    Thank you for the recommendation of the Truffle and Wine tasting in Tuscany. We will be honeymooning there June 2018 in Lucca and Siena. I have made some enquiries with them today.

    Amanda

    Reply

    • Debbie

      Hi Amanda!! ooh how exciting!! Congratulations 🙂
      We absolutely loved our day at Torciano! and really can't recommend them enough. The wine tasting is absolutely worth it just on its own but add in the truffle hunting and the cookery course and it really is a very special experience. And if you're heading in that direction I highly recommend a quick look around the nearby towns: San Gimignano and Volterra - if you haven't already got these down 🙂
      Have the best time!! xx

      Reply

    • Randy cone

      Traditional Tiramisu Recipe (11)
      I cook but very seldom do I bake. This recipe is excellent . Easy to follow, loaded with important tips. My Tiramisu turned out perfect. My egg whites were not coming to stiff peaks ( I must have had some yolk in them) so I just separated some more eggs. I used Starbucks Italian roast instant packets and just added them to the Tia Maria. I can’t tell you how pleased I was with my final product! Everyone raved on about it being the best they had ever had and my guests were all recent visitors to Italy. Thank you so much for this thorough recipe,I am a man that cooks about 6 dishes really well. Desserts kind of scare me. I now have confidence to try other recipes on your site.I couldn’t find castor sugar so I put my regular sugar in the blender.I highly recommend this recipe for someone with little experience,simply read threw completely a couple of times.This is the best Tiramisu ever. Everyone asked for the recipe and said how authentic it was.

      Reply

  2. Choclette

    Truffle hunting sounds ever so exciting. I don't think I've ever seen a real truffle. Tiramisu is one of CT's favourites and he'd love to tuck into your version. Unluckily for him, I've not much of a coffee fan, so he might just need to pay you a visit 😉

    Thanks for sharing with #WeShouldCocoa.

    Reply

    • Debbie

      Hahaha - he'd be more thank welcome. Yes we loved the truffle hunting. So clever how they train the dogs.

      Reply

  3. Kat (The Baking Explorer)

    Just noticed you've linked them to #TreatPetite too - thanks for joining in!

    Reply

    • Debbie

      Thanks for hosting!! 🤗

      Reply

  4. Kat (The Baking Explorer)

    They look absolutely divine!

    Reply

    • Debbie

      Thank you Kat! 😊

      Reply

  5. Corina

    Your Tia Maria tiramisu looks wonderful! I am also incredibly envious of your fantastic day out at Torciano. If I am ever in Italy it's definitely something I'd love to do too. Thanks so much for sharing with #CookOnceEatTwice x

    Reply

    • Debbie

      So glad to hear that Corina - its definitely worth stopping by if you happen to be near by! Great day and I'm sure we'll be returning ourselves

      Reply

  6. Because Food Is Love

    Your tiramisu looks absolutely delicious! I love tiramisu but I've never made it. You've definitely convinced me to make it, yum! 🙂 Thanks for sharing.

    Reply

    • Debbie

      ooh you should definitely have a go at making it then 🙂 Hope you get the chance - let me know!! 🙂

      Reply

  7. Lizet Flores de Bowen

    Debbie, looks like your day was amazing! how jealous! That dessert looks so creamy and delicious. Thanks for sharing the recipe!

    Reply

    • Debbie

      Thank you! its definitely very creamy 🙂 thanks for stopping by 🙂

      Reply

  8. hijackedbytwins

    I adore tirimisu, it is definitely a favourite of mine! I would love to go hunting for truffles, it sounds like you had a great time x #CookBlogShare

    Reply

    • Debbie

      Thanks Kirsty - it really was a very special day 🙂

      Reply

Traditional Tiramisu Recipe (2024)
Top Articles
Latest Posts
Article information

Author: Delena Feil

Last Updated:

Views: 6328

Rating: 4.4 / 5 (45 voted)

Reviews: 84% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Delena Feil

Birthday: 1998-08-29

Address: 747 Lubowitz Run, Sidmouth, HI 90646-5543

Phone: +99513241752844

Job: Design Supervisor

Hobby: Digital arts, Lacemaking, Air sports, Running, Scouting, Shooting, Puzzles

Introduction: My name is Delena Feil, I am a clean, splendid, calm, fancy, jolly, bright, faithful person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.